Tampa locals speak out on the new Health Bill
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03/22/10 Joshua Lee Holton
WMNF Drive-Time News Monday | Listen to this entire show:

With the health care bill passing the U.S. House last night, many Republicans are outraged, Democrats are encouraged, and some don’t seem to really know anything about the bill. Today, WMNF asked students and Tampa locals what they thought about the bill outside the Marshall Center at the University of South Florida’s Tampa campus.

I think it’s a good thing, just because so many people are uninsured in our country. And I’m actually uninsured, and going to the doctor, when I have to go, costs me 300 dollars for the visit, another 600 for lab work, and that shouldn’t be the case—especially in a country developed like the United States.

Yeah, I will be getting health benefits. But right now, you know, I’m still in college, so I still have my parents’—I’m under my parents’ health care. And then I’m thinking how it’s going to affect my bosses, and how it’s going to affect my own paycheck and taxes, and, yeah. Where I’m at right now, I feel like I don’t need it as much, but I know that in the future, you know—I work with some older people, and they’ll definitely need it, too. So I’ve got mixed feelings on it, to be completely honest.

I want to talk to someone who actually knows what’s in the health care bill myself, ’cause I don’t know. But I do know that Obama’s promising a lot of big things, and I want to know where this money’s coming from.

It could really do a lot of good for a lot of people—if they implement it, you know, well. If they don’t screw things up.

You know, there’s a lot of people who can’t even afford health care. And this will help them be able to do that. But at the same time, there are some downfalls with that, you know, for the people who can’t afford any health care. And just wondering, you know, are they going to be fined? What’s going to happen to people who can’t afford any insurance, and that type of thing. So those are just a couple of my thoughts on it.

If anything, I would be scared by the requirement to have health care, because there are many people whose jobs don’t provide it, or they don’t have jobs, or they just plain wouldn’t be able to afford it. So to fine people that don’t have an income that provides health care, and then fining them for not having it, would be my biggest worry if it got to that point.

I’m hoping that it will actually come out to help the public, you know. I just lost my health insurance this year; they changed eligibility at work, so I’ve lost my health care. And I’m really hoping this bill will be able to provide health care for those who can’t get it otherwise.

You know, I think it’s a step in the right direction. It might not be the best step in that—it might not be the best step, you know. I think that we’ve been needing health care reform for a long time, and we definitely are getting some type of health care reform. I think it might have been a little sneaky the way it was kind of pushed through in a lot of ways; people made it clear that maybe they didn’t want this exact bill. But either way, it’s a step in the right direction. Hopefully, it’ll give some more coverage to millions of more Americans.

Better than the public option. I was not for the public option, because I will not wait three months for a sniffle. I won’t do it. I won’t do it. I’m not a Canadian; I’m an American.

I think the health care bill, if it makes health care accessible for everyone who needs it, would be a good thing. My only concern is the cost, and the reimbursement for medical offices, which I’m not real sure right now what those items are going to pan out to be. But if we can make the health care bill have health care accessible to everyone, and it would be affordable for America, that would be a great thing.

The health care bill, I feel, like I said—I don’t really know much about, like, what’s going on. But I do feel like in the long run, it probably will help out a lot of people for sure. And if it’s—if there’s a way that people are going to be able to get health care, and benefit themselves in the long run—like, as far as, obviously with their health—I mean, I think it’s going to make it easier for them. And that’s definitely good. I don’t see what’s bad about that at all.

I do think it should be made more clear, more accessible, to everybody. Not everyone has time to sit down and read the entire bill. I think there should be something where everybody would understand, basically, the high points, the low points—so they know what they’re getting themselves into, what to expect, since it was just passed.

Although the health care reform bill passed the House of Representatives late last night, President Obama won’t sign it into law until tomorrow.

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