Nation reporter talks poverty & Discussion surrounding Ani DiFranco's Nottoway Plantation controversy
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01/09/14 Mary Glenney
From A Woman's Point of View | Listen to this entire show:
Tags: poverty, Zoe Carpenter, Nottoway Plantation, Adele Stan, Ani DiFranco

This week on a Woman's Point of View the following topics were covered:

Zoe Carpenter

Congress is back in session and there are important issues that need to be examined. Zoe Carpenter a reporter in The Nation's Washington, DC bureau, has written for Rolling Stone, Guernica and the Poughkeepsie Journal. An Oregon native, Zoë studied writing and environmental politics at Vassar College. She will discuss some of what she considers the most important issues, including Unemployment Insurance and Social Security. With today being the 50th anniversary of President Johnson’s War on Poverty, both sides are digging in. In light of the growing disparity in income in this country, do you see the War on Poverty as a failure or do you wonder where people would be without the food stamps, Unemployment Insurance and some of the other measures enacted during that period that are barely keeping people afloat?

Say It isn’t so, Ani

Have you followed the recent “flap” over the issues surrounding the cancellation of Ani DiFranco’s “Righteous Retreat”? Righteous reasoning? The problem was the chosen location, scheduled for the Nottoway Plantation, acknowledged as the largest antebellum plantation in the South, run by the John Randolph family, in which 155 slaves served 13 members of the Randolph family. Louisiana is known for its ghosts, but many felt such haunting might cause nightmares to some and be ill suited for the righteous remedies. Adele Stan is a journalist based in Washington, D.C., who specializes in covering the intersection of religion and politics. She is RH Reality Check's senior Washington correspondent who spent time at the Nottoway Plantation in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina when that was the only accommodation available and still has chilling memories of the place.

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