88.5 Now – WMNF’s July Newsletter

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Thanks for throwing in on gas!
We’re all filled up and ready to cruise on down the road! WMNF is steering towards another summer of community, music and FUN.  We are so excited to take this trip with you, and it’s your friendship that keeps this station a’ rockin!

Last. Local. Radio. Those three words say it all.  You may have seen the billboards around town.  It’s our way of telling those in the area who haven’t heard: when it comes to real community radio, we’re the last of our kind!

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And it’s only with your support that we’re going to stay on the air!  Are you a Circle of Friends member yet?  It’s the best way to give.  If you’re already in the circle, talk to a friend or family member about supporting community radio that gives them a voice! They can donate here, or you can increase your monthly gift! Thank you!
https://www.wmnf.org/support/donate/

Another great way to support your station is our vehicle donation program.  Got an old car sitting around collecting dust?  Donate it to WMNF and turn your burden into a gift.  

Call 1-888-966-3885 and we’ll take that old car or truck off your hands!

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Production Profile: Masani Musa and JxHoney

Every Saturday night, sisters Masani Musa and JxHoney bring the freshest hip-hop and R & B to the airwaves on The Vibe.  While they share a lot in common, they bring their individual influences to the show, and combine them to curate two hours of beautiful music.  The duo doesn’t stop there, they also take on political issues and current affairs.  Both agree that the main goals of the show are to play good music, bring awareness to the community and represent the voices of black women.

Their father, a long time listener of WMNF, recommended the sisters reach out about the possiblity of hosting a show.  The first person they met was JoEllen Schilke, WMNF Community Relations Manager.  They told her about their previous experience with radio and media on college radio and JoEllen was thrilled at the idea of them hosting a show. From there they met with Craig Kopp, Randy Wind and Dwaine Terry. from the station and before they knew it, they were asked to be on the air.

“We didn’t even think we were going to have a show on the air.  But after the meeting, we got an email saying how much they enjoyed the interview and it just happened.”

On January 21st, 2017 the duo launched The Vibe. Since then, they’ve had time to develop their show and find their voice on the airwaves.

“At first, we were a little bit tense, only because it was a new environment and we had to kind of feel everything out.  After a while, we kind of loosened up, and we were able to kind of form this vibe.  We know that’s the name of our show, but we really created this aura around our show that people enjoy.”

This aura has lead to a wide array of loyal listeners and contributors to the show.  To the sisters, that’s what really makes the show special.

“We have someone who writes in from a local penitentiary.  We have a loyal fan base out in Weeki Wachee.  We have an R & B lover who calls in to request every Saturday.  We’ve developed a dedicated following of listeners and we’re thankful for that.”

Their show is influenced by “the independent music wave” as they call it.  They want their listeners to tune into their show knowing that they are going to hear new and interesting music from a variety of different genres, along with updates on current affairs.

“About 95% of our show features music by independent artists, so that really drives us to find new music.  Also, world events involving people of color.  Often times, when a person of color is on the radio, they can’t say how they truly feel on certain topics. But since we’re on WMNF and we do have the liberty to not abide by corporate standards, we talk about these things from a real perspective.”

While Masani Musa and JxHoney agree on a lot of things, they do have their own individual tastes in music. JxHoney loves world music, including music from Brazil and Afro-beat, she prefers music that moves her.  Masani loves a good melody, and all kinds of hip-hop from old school to trap and even jazz music from the 60s and 70s.  They both have a deep love for A Tribe Called Quest.

Masani and JxHoney are excited about the future of their show.  They hope to gain more listeners, but also to meet and get to know them in person.  It’s DJs like these who keep the community in community radio.

“WMNF means freedom of expression. It’s so special because you have all these different people coming out to talk, and engaging their audiences.  It’s about culture and diversity. To see so many different programs on the station that bring people together, that’s WMNF.”

Find out more and stream The Vibe herehttps://www.wmnf.org/events/the-vibe/

Production Profile: Frank Knox

From the newsroom to the music of 49′-69′ on his show Retro Jukebox, the name Frank Knox is well known at WMNF.  He’s won multiple Volunteer of the Year awards, and lends his talents to the station because of his strong belief in community.  On his show, he delights his listeners with a journey through the two decades of his youth, and has gained a dedicated fanbase. Frank says we shouldn’t forget his faithful companion Charlie the Dog’s work.  As Frank puts it, “Charlie’s in the library guarding the vinyl.”

Frank loves cars and worked in the car business for most of his life.  He was working at a local dealership when a co-worker let him know about WMNF.  He was inspired to reach out.

“In 2012, I talked to JoEllen and started volunteering.  I started working with Gene doing lots of paperwork. Then I met Flee ended up in the library for around three years.”

At the time, Sheila Cowley was the Operations Manager at WMNF.  Frank started getting the urge to get in the studio and asked Sheila how to go about doing that.

“The next day (Traffic Jam host) John Palmer asked me if I’d go in the studio with him to help with his playlist. Soon after, I’m in the kitchen and Randy comes in and asks if I’d like to do the early morning show on Wednesday.  I was thrilled, it’s an honor to host the show.”

Retro Jukebox is a chronological journey through the years of his youth, 1949-1969.  This span of years opens the door for Frank to play a wide variety of music for his audience.

“It’s great to be able to play Wynonie Harris at the beginning of a show and end with Cream.  I like to break the music up, I change it constantly.  There’s so many songs out there to pick from.”

His formula works. He’s attracted a following of listeners over his past three years on the air.  Like most shows on WMNF, there are the regulars who can’t get enough of Retro Jukebox.

“There’s a guy named Mike who’s been listening forever, 89 years old.  Zack, who calls every week. Charlie from Kissimee, if the clouds are aligned right he gets reception.”

In his youth Frank listened to and participated in vocal harmony music which Frank says kept him out of trouble.  The first 45 record he got was “Keep a Knockin” by Little Richard.

“I grew up with the Everly Brothers and Elvis, but I grew up with it all, so I love it all.”

That love includes cars.  He spent his life working on and around them and even drag raced for 45 years before retiring from the track.  After decades as a road warrior, Frank now spends a lot of his time prepping for his show and volunteering at WMNF.  His commitment to the station is admirable and he says it comes from a feeling that he hasn’t found anywhere else.

“There are many things that WMNF has done for me.  I never paid attention to politics, now I do.  If I never went, it would’ve been a loss, because overall it’s what I do.  It’s all the people at the station that make it special. I don’t care what you need, you’re going to find someone who will help you out right away.  The comraderie is just amazing.”

Find out more and stream Retro Jukebox here: https://www.wmnf.org/events/retro-jukebox/​

Event Notes:

WMNF’s 2018 Americana Fest – July 14th 4 pm – 11:40 pm – Skipper’s Smokehouse 
910 Skipper Road Tampa, FL 33613

Pleased To Meet You: The WMNF 75th Birthday Tribute to Mick Jagger – July 27th 7 pm – 11:55 pm – Jannus Live  200 1st Avenue, St. Petersburg, FL 33701

Ordinary Boys: The Smiths and Morrissey Tribute Act – August 11th 8pm-11pm – Crowbar – 1812 N. 17th St. Tampa, FL 33605

Homegrown Heroes: An Afternoon of Art, Activism and Accolades – August 19th   – Gulfport Casino – 5500 Shore Blvd. S, Gulfport, FL 33707

WMNF 39th Birthday – Street of Dreams – September 10th 6 pm – 9 pm – Ella’s Americana Folk Art Cafe – 5119 Nebraska Ave. Tampa, FL 33603

Southern Avenue – September 23rd 6 pm – 10 pm – Skipper’s Smokehouse – 910 Skipper Road Tampa, FL 33613

Click here for details: www.wmnf.org/wmnf-events/ or call 813-238-8001
Don’t forget to share the love.  Tell a friend about WMNF!

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